Car Detailing

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The STiG
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Car Detailing

Postby The STiG » Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:44 am

Just thought that I would post up some pics and process of one of my friends in the US that is a car detailer. Im sure ppl have seen the other pics of I have put up of Phil's work in my Ferrari, ///M, Porsche, MB threads.

Here is one of MY06 Pignose STi.
Enjoy.

This car needed:
Wash
Clay
Minor paint correction
Swissvax Treatment: Cleaner Fluid followed by Swissvax Mystery!

Interior: vac, Einszett Cockpit

Products used:
LussoAuto Bathe
Lusso Glass Polish
Swissvax Clay Bar
Adam's Detail Spray
Adam's In and out
Adam's VRT
Adam's Metal 1 and 2
Black Wow
P21S Auto wash
P21S Wheel Cleaner
Einszett Cockpit

For the paint:
Menzerna 106FA
Swissvax Cleaner Fluid
Swissvax Mystery

Tools used:
Karcher
karcher Foam Canon
Makita 9227
3M Bumper Pad
CCS White
CCS Blue
Deflesko DFT
3M Sun Gun

Before int:
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After int:
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Before Engine:
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After Engine:
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Trim piece before:
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Trim piece after with Black Wow:
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Exhaust before:
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Exhaust after with Adam's Metal 1 and Adam's Metal 2
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Look inside the tip...so clean :)
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Lusso Auto Bathe:
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Before shots:
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Presoak with P21S Auto Wash:
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Measuring the paint with the Delfesko DFT:
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Before/Side by Side/ and after shots of correction on the trunk:
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After shot:
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Swissvax Mystery :dance:
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After shots:
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Last picture:
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Ada///M.

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The STiG
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Postby The STiG » Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:49 am

Swirl Marks....

The PRO's of getting you baby back to showroom condition.

SWIRL MARKS ARE OFTEN A NATURAL CONSEQUENCE OF THE JOB YOU ARE PERFORMING


Published in "Auto Laundry News" in January 1999

If I mention “swirl marks” to you as a detailer, how do you react? Do you get the shakes, start to sweat, develop a nervous twitch? Some detailers view swirl marks as a major catastrophe, while others view them as a minor obstacle in completing a perfect job.

The real problem occurs when a vehicle with remaining swirl marks is delivered to the customer: The detailer is viewed as unprofessional and/or incompetent. The customer is now hesitant to have the car detailed again, fearing the same results. This gives the industry as a whole a bad name. Unfortunately, detailers who have the skill and expertise to do the job correctly are grouped in the same category as those who do not.

WHAT ARE SWIRL MARKS?

Swirl marks, or buffer marks as some people refer to them, are circular cuts or abrasions in the paint surface. They take the form and reflect the diameter of the buffing pad and follow the direction in which the detailer was moving the buffer along the paint surface. Many times the area will have a reduced degree of gloss.

These cuts and abrasions reflect light differently off the panels of the vehicle. The light will bounce off in various directions, instead of uniformly in one direction. You will see the most variance in direct sunlight. The gloss and clarity will be greatly affected because of these dreaded “swirl marks.” Unlike most light scratches (which can make their appearance anywhere on the vehicle), the swirl marks are unacceptable to customers because of their unnatural appearance, and because the customer “paid” for these results.


HOW DID THEY GET THERE?

Swirl marks are not a factory option, and they don’t just suddenly appear out of the blue. Somebody, in the process of trying to do something to the paint surface, put them there. Unfortunately, there are many reasons why swirls appear;
here are some of the explanations:

* Choosing a buffing pad that is too aggressive is common. A heavy cut wool pad will inflict deep swirls on most clear-coat surfaces. In fact, the use of most wool pads on a clear-coat surface will leave swirl marks.
* Using the buffer at very high speed will continue to put swirls in the finish. Speed creates heat. Heat softens the clear and that combination is a recipe not only for swirl marks, but also for “burning” the paint finish.
* The wrong choice of compound or polish can also produce swirl marks. Using a product that is too aggressive will cut into the surface quicker and deeper and leave swirl marks.
* Not using enough compound or polish will quicken the appearance of swirls. Keeping enough product between the buffing pad and the paint surface will act as a lubricant and slow the swirling process down.
* Not keeping the buffing pad flat on the paint surface can also cause swirls. Many detailers have a tendency to “come up on edge” with the outer part of the buffing pad. Doing this will put swirls in the paint much faster.

In addition to these issues, there are other variables to consider. Know the model car you are working on. Has this make of vehicle given you trouble previously? Some vehicles are very easily scratched. It does not take a lot to put a mark in the paint surface. If you get to know how hard or soft the clear is, you can judge what can and can’t be done to the surface without leaving swirl marks.

What exactly needs to be done to the paint surface? Are there major imperfections on or in the paint? Does it just need a polish and a wax? If you are not doing corrective procedures to the paint, you should utilize the least aggressive method possible.

If you take account of all the factors that could impact the creation of swirl marks before you begin to work on the car, you can develop a game plan to do the job correctly.


HOW TO CORRECTLY REMOVE SWIRLS.

Once you realize that the swirl marks are there, you can determine what method to use to remove them. Often, you will leave swirls behind as a natural consequence of the job you are performing. For instance, a deep scratch has to be sanded or compounded to remove it. This will certainly cause swirls. Other examples are acid rain removal, or the elimination of scuffs and/or other blemishes. Most of the time, the first step in this process will be aggressive enough to leave swirl marks behind. Before you can take corrective action, you must identify what type of swirl you’re dealing with:

Compound Swirl - This is a swirl mark that is cut deeper into the finish. It was probably brought about by a heavy cut wool pad, and a medium to heavy cut compound. Depending on the speed of the buffer at the time it was created, the swirl mark may be fairly deep into the surface.

Polish Swirl - This type of swirl is still unsightly, but not as deep into the paint surface. This may have been created with a lighter wool pad, or even a light-cut foam pad.

To remove swirl marks you must take your time; a number of steps may be necessary. If a vehicle has been heavily compounded to remove scratches, acid rain, haziness, or other imperfections from the paint, you may want to try a multi-step swirl-removal process. Your swirl remover product must have light cutting ability to level out the surface. You also must use a light cutting foam pad, or a genuine lambs wool pad as the first step. This first step may sometimes be necessary because the swirls may be fairly deep into the clear coat, and leveling them in two steps will ensure total removal. If you were to use just a polishing foam pad and a very light swirl-remover polish, you may not remove them completely, and they may reappear after a few washings.

The second step in a deep-swirl removal process is the same as if the vehicle had light polish swirls to begin with. Use a foam pad with a PPI rating of about 80 (For more information about PPI ratings, see the article “Buffing Pads” in the November 1998 issue of Auto Laundry News). This type of pad will not cut so deeply and, as a result, will not put more swirls back into the surface. Run the high-speed buffer at no higher than 1,500 rpm. Remember, don’t be too aggressive with speed and heat in this step or you’ll defeat the whole purpose of the exercise. A true swirl remover product with some cutting or leveling ability will be the product of choice to use on the surface. Work in small sections at a time and move slowly over the area that you are buffing. You should be able to see the swirls disappear if you are doing it correctly.


WHY ARE THEY STILL THERE?

If the process was done correctly, the swirl marks will not come back. You have leveled out the surface and removed the swirl marks. The trouble some detailers have with swirls is this:

1.
Wrong choice of buffing pad, swirl remover product, and/or speed on the buffer. Some products have a lot of silicone and oils in them and may hide or fill the swirl marks, giving the detailer the false impression that they are gone.
2.
Poor lighting. Many shops have lighting that is insufficient to correctly check to make sure the swirls are gone. Fluorescent light is not enough to correctly view the panel. I have found that halogen lights simulate sunlight sufficiently well to check if the swirls remain. They are cheap, portable, and have different lighting capacities from 300 to 1000 watts. If halogen is not available, you may have to take the vehicle outside into the sun. This is a great aid in making sure the swirl marks are gone. Fluorescent light shows many imperfections that natural light does not, but does not pick up fine swirl marks all that well.
3.
Inexperience. You must have a good eye and know what you are looking for. The panel may have had a scratch or blemish to begin with. You compounded it out and gave the panel a nice shine and it looks quite a bit better than when you started, but fine swirls will probably still be present. A good detailer will know that the panel is still not quite finished.
4.
Poor quality control or not enough time given to work on the vehicle. If the detailer is somewhat inexperienced, there should be a supervisor present to point out the fine swirl marks and instruct him to perform an additional step to remove them. Sometimes, however, there is not enough time, or the job isn’t paying enough to justify that extra step.

It is discouraging to take a vehicle into direct sunlight and discover on its finish swirl marks you thought you had successfully removed, or, worse, having an unhappy customer bring the vehicle back when he finds the marks. By far the worst, though, is the customer who discovers the marks, but does not bring the car back — ever — because he views you as an unprofessional incompetent.


GO AWAY AND NEVER COME BACK!

There is an age-old method of quality control you can employ when removing swirl marks. Fill a spray bottle with a 50/50 mix of isopropyl alcohol and water. Spray the surface you have just completed and let the solution sit for approximately 15 seconds. Wipe the area with a clean soft towel and observe. What you have done is remove any silicone, wax, and oils that may have filled the swirls instead of eliminating them. This is where the halogen lights come in handy. Shine the light directly on the panel and look for fine swirls. If they are still present, you should be able to see them. If you have done the job correctly, you will see a clear, bright reflection off the panel with a great shine, depth, and clarity. This finish says the swirls are gone.


DON’T LET THE COLOR FOOL YOU

We all know that swirl marks are more easily visible on dark colored cars. You actually see the swirls in the clear coat but the dark background color (the base coat) is a good backdrop. Don’t get lazy and skip a step because you may be working on a light colored vehicle. You may have to look a little harder, but you will see swirls on a light color. A customer with a good eye will see them, too. Remember that you are buffing the clear, and the same steps and procedures should be followed regardless of the vehicle color.


DON’T BE AFRAID

Don’t be afraid of swirl marks. Sometimes the biggest mistake you can make when detailing a vehicle is being too timid with the paint. If the surface needs to be cut into, there is a good chance that some kind of swirl mark will be left behind. If you do not give the paint surface what it needs to look its best because you are afraid of leaving behind swirl marks, you are cheating both yourself and the customer.

Don’t worry about swirl marks. Be aware of them but don’t be afraid of them. If you are not being paid for a multi-step procedure, try not to use a wool pad. Most of the time, this type of pad will leave behind swirl marks to some degree. If a one-step procedure is being used, employ a finishing foam pad on the high-speed buffer, or use an orbital machine to polish the vehicle. The key in the buffing process is to know how the paint will react to each step you are performing. Once you know that swirl marks are fairly easy to remove, you will have the confidence to do what the car needs.
Ada///M.

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The STiG
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Postby The STiG » Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:51 am

CLAY CAN TURN A GOOD JOB INTO A GREAT JOB

Depending on whom you speak to, clay can either be one of the most useful “tools” in your shop, or just an expensive piece of play-dough. It’s been around for quite a few years now. Some detailers have embraced it, while some have no use for it. I believe that clay can be a valuable tool with many uses.

OVER SPRAY REMOVAL

The most obvious and popular use for clay is over spray removal. For this, it has been a godsend. Before clay, detailers had to use other methods for the removal of over spray. Compounding, which involves friction, heat, and heavy cleaners, is one such method. However, along with the over spray, this friction and heat could also remove some of the paint.

Another method for over spray removal involves dissolving the over spray with solvents, such as lacquer thinner, and rubbing it off. However, if a vehicle has a single stage paint system (e.g., lacquer, enamel) some of the paint, including possibly a painted pinstripe, will dissolve along with the over spray. In addition, this method can be hazardous to other parts of the vehicle, as well as to the detailer.

A third method for over spray removal is wet-sanding the finish. Potential problems with this method include rubbing through the finish, and putting sand scratch-marks in the finish, which would later need to be buffed out.


ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTANTS

The beauty of clay is that it can be used for more than just over spray removal. Foreign particles often cannot be washed off a vehicle’s surface. The clay bar is designed to pull these particles off the paint finish, without harming the paint, by releasing the bond between the foreign particles and the paint surface.

Today’s paint systems are mostly polyurethane base coat/clear coat, which actually is a form of plastic. When plastic heats up, it gets softer. This is what happens when a vehicle is left out in the hot sun all day. The heat generated by the engine, sun, and color of the paint can cause the surface temperature to reach over 200 degrees. This will soften the clear coat and allow foreign particles to embed themselves in the surface and bond to it. This is the major reason why particles remain even after the car has been washed.

The mistake many detailers make is thinking that these particles can be easily buffed or waxed off the surface during the normal polishing procedure. However, the problem is that the contaminant material is often quite durable and has a strong adhesive bond to the painted surface. Trying to buff or wet-sand the contaminant off the finish may do irreparable paint damage.


MANY ADVANTAGES

In addition to the removal of over spray, clay has many advantages:


- Clay will pull unwanted contaminants off any hard, non-porous surface faster than wet-sanding, compounding, or using solvents, with no damage to the vehicle’s finish.

- Clay will save a huge amount of time compared with other methods such as compounding, wet-sanding or the use of solvents.

- Clay will leave you with a surface that is as smooth as glass, making that surface easier to buff.

- Clay will work on any hard surface (e.g., glass, hard moldings, chrome, wheels, and other trim) where solvents can be dangerous and buffers cannot reach or may cause damage.

- Clay will work on most types of over spray, regardless of its composition.

- Clay will not harm the vehicle’s finish.


The use of clay can turn a good job into a great job. Have you ever polished a car and it looked great? No swirls, no streaks and a great shine but, when you rubbed the palm of your hand over the surface, it felt gritty or like sandpaper? This indicates that foreign materials, not removed by buffing or waxing, have been left on the surface. Customers always want to touch their newly detailed vehicle. Feeling grit on the surface will diminish their satisfaction. Claying will remove foreign materials and grit and will leave the customer completely satisfied.

Have you ever buffed a car and the buffer would not glide along, or would bounce, or drag? Have you spent a lot of extra time and effort on certain spots that you could still see sitting on the surface? In order to remedy these problems an unskilled detailer may try to buff off contamination by turning up the speed of the buffer, use a harsh compound or stay on the spot too long with the buffer. Employing these methods may result in paint damage. Using clay will avoid these difficulties and save time.
CLAY EVERY CAR


I clay almost every car I work on. This may sound extreme, but I don’t want a customer to feel anything except smooth sheet metal when he runs his hand over the surface of his vehicle.

The surface isn’t totally clean if there is any grit left behind. By claying every car before you put a buffer to it, you are assured of a few things:

- The surface will be clean;
- The entire buffing process will be easier;
- You will use less material because the buffing pad will glide along the surface better, and cover a greater area;
- You will have a better guide to exactly what has to be done to the finish.

Claying may seem like extra work, but you can actually save time by employing this extra step. That’s right, you can actually save time and produce a finer finish.

Consider the following:
- Buffing out all those little spots that remain on the surface wastes time;
- Using a more aggressive pad (which is necessary to remove little spots from the vehicle’s surface) leaves behind swirl marks and creates the extra step of swirl-mark removal;
- On a contaminated surface, the buffer drags and slows you down;
- A contaminated surface requires more cleaning product. This increases the chance of flinging the product which produces more mess and greater clean up time. Claying saves time by avoiding these issues.

Before clay.
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During the procedure.
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After clay
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You may not be convinced. You may still be thinking that the extra time taken to clay the vehicle is counterproductive. It may seem as though you will spend as much time with the clay as you would with the buffer. And the amount of elbow grease required to clay the vehicle may give you a workout that you don’t want. Let’s look closer.

By claying the vehicle first, you will pull off any contamination that remains on the surface of the vehicle after it’s been washed. What you are left with is a super-smooth finish. Now you have a true idea as to exactly what that finish needs in order to look its very best. You may be able to use a less aggressive polish or cleaner, or a foam pad instead of a wool pad. The chances of leaving swirl marks are also greatly decreased because you can now run the buffer at a slower speed with a less aggressive polish and pad. Also, the buffer should glide smoothly across the surface with little or no drag, and you will not need to concentrate on particular problem areas that may still have spots left behind. Believe it or not, this will save a great deal of time.

It should take approximately 25 minutes to clay a mid-size car from the door moldings on up. However, Above: After clay. by claying the vehicle first, you will save time on the entire buffing procedure because of the things I just mentioned. Also, you will save time during the final step, be it waxing or paint sealant, because of the glass-like surface that is left behind and the ease of removal of the wax or sealant. In addition to time saved, other benefits include:

* A surface that feels awesome to the touch, like a brand new car;
* Greater depth and clarity, because of the truly clean finish;
* A faster rate of buffing for the foam-pad user;
* An almost zero chance of swirl marks and paint damage.

HOW TO USE CLAY

As with any other “tool” in your shop, there is a correct way to use clay for optimum benefits. A clay bar must be kept clean at all times because it is being rubbed over the paint surface. If dropped on the floor, the clay bar should be thrown away because it will pick up contaminants that could damage the paint. Some companies are now supplying a few thinner bars in one container. This allows easy access to another bar without having to buy a new piece.

Before claying, the vehicle should be thoroughly washed. This is a crucial step that cannot be skipped. Washing will get most of the dirt and contamination off the car, but you will be surprised at what is left behind — even on brand new vehicles. The clay must be used in conjunction with a lubricant. You may use spray wax, or a soap-and-water solution in a spray bottle.

Work a small 2-foot-by-2-foot area and keep the clay flat to the surface while rubbing it through the lubricant. Knead the clay frequently to bring fresh material to the surface. Pass over the surface a number of times to release the contaminants from the surface. Wipe the area clean with a soft towel, being careful not to put scratches in the finish. The contamination will be suspended in the lubricant and captured on the towel, leaving the finish clean and smooth. You can see what a great job the clay does by looking at how dirty the towel becomes after completing only a few small areas. You may need to replace the towel every so often as it becomes dirty. You will notice how clean, smooth and shiny the area becomes. It may look like it has just been polished. When claying, you will pick up all the contaminants that washing the car did not get off. Remember, be very careful not to pick up abrasives that can be dragged across the finish and leave scratches. Now, without the extra contamination on the surface, the entire car will be easier to polish and wax.


WHAT CLAY CAN’T DO

Clay cannot...

- Remove scratches. A scratch is a scratch and corrective measures must be taken;
- Take the place of compounding, polishing, or waxing. This is a tool for cleaning the surface. It will not buff the surface. Even though the finish will feel as if it’s been waxed, there is no protection whatsoever on the finish;
- Remove over spray or contamination from soft, porous trim and moldings. If the over spray has penetrated the surface, the clay will not work. As you gain experience, you will be able to tell what parts of the vehicle will need another type - Remove acid rain. If the vehicle has an acid-rain problem, a neutralization wash must be employed to neutralize the finish, or the acid-rain spots will come back;
- Remove rail dust. If there is a rail-dust problem and metal particles are embedded in the surface, a neutralization wash, again, must be used first. If all the particles still have not been released, you may have to repeat the neutralization wash.

Some problems exist in the paint, as well as on the surface. A clay procedure will only take care of problems that exist on the surface, not underneath the surface. As you become more experienced with all paint-finish problems, you will be able to determine correctly which methods to use.

Even with its limitations, I consider clay to be an invaluable tool in the detailing process. Clay can increase business by enhancing the overall appearance of a vehicle and heightening customer satisfaction. It can replace harmful procedures, and is safer for both you, and your customer’s car.
Ada///M.

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Gav
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Postby Gav » Mon Jan 21, 2008 4:15 pm

wow

i don't understand it all but the results are impressive!

think i need to read this a few times
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Black EVO IX
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cpitts
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby cpitts » Sun Mar 23, 2008 12:35 pm

Some good explanation and example stuff there STiG. :)

The hard part is fixing it and not damaging the duco again!
'07 Lib GT Spec B <- adjusting
Done: Intake, Brakes, Stereo 90%, bars, AVO TMIC
To fit: Sil intake, ECU, 3 Port, Walbro
WWW (button below) for my Subaru/Audi dyno's, detailing, pics and mods!

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Re: Car Detailing

Postby chriskan » Sun Mar 23, 2008 6:31 pm

hmm.. i wrote a long reply and it's disappared.. anyway :) summary:

Thanks for that STiG.. particularly the info on claying, I might have a go at claying the lib myself before winter, and a polish/wax thereafter.. need to invest in an RO soon.

That boost gauge holder looks neat! Any chance you could ask him for the source/brand?

:)
MY07 Liberty GT-B tuned by STI 6MT - #244/300
Mods are coming! :thumbs:

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The STiG
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby The STiG » Sun Mar 23, 2008 7:43 pm

Most welcome and DONT YOU HATE WHEN YOUR REPLIES JUST VANISH..... :x :chair: :x :chair: :x :chair: :chair: :x :x :chair:
I will certainly ask the question if you like.
Will come back to you ASAP.
Ada///M.

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Re: Car Detailing

Postby KNGWRX » Sun Mar 23, 2008 11:25 pm

What did he use on the engine bay? And what method?

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The STiG
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby The STiG » Mon Apr 28, 2008 6:15 pm

CG CWC
CG Grime Reaper
CG fabric protectant
CG BareBones
CG Fade2Black
CG New Car Solvent
CG Glass Cleaner
1Z Cockpit Premium
1Z Blitz
1Z Glass Polish
P21S TAW
P21S Gel Wheel Cleaner
Valuegard ABC
CD2
Leather Master Trio
OPT QID
OPT Interior Protectant
DG Aquawax
Aquapel Treatment

Clay:
CG Green/Blue/Grey/Purple Clay
CG SQD as Lube

Paint Correction:

Menzerna SIP
Menzerna 106FF
Megs M105
LCC LoPro White LCC LoPro Orange


Zymol Duster

Equipment:
Defelsko P6000
Defelsko P200
Defelsko Wireless Printer
Defelsko Posisoft
Dell Laptop
MyteeLite II
Therma Steem
Brinkman
3m Sun Gun
3m backing plate
CM5300
Metabo
Hitachi Rotary


Protection:
CG Jetseal109

LSP:
Z*mol Vintage
w Field Glaze



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Ada///M.

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The STiG
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby The STiG » Mon Apr 28, 2008 6:21 pm

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Clay bar after pretty much used 2 clay bars on this car.
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Engine Before
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Engine After
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Interior After
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Before Hood:
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After Hood:
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Swissvax Mystery:
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After shots:
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Ada///M.

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cpitts
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby cpitts » Mon Apr 28, 2008 6:44 pm

Some very nice shots there Adam. :thumbs: The owner of the M3 should be shot! The RS4 wasn't too bad (same colour as the wifes) but presents exceptional when done properly. :smart:

That product list is as long as your arm :o and ooooooh so expensive. The funniest thing is the dull, drab cars in the background of these shots. :lol: Most of them need a good goin over. :roll:
'07 Lib GT Spec B <- adjusting
Done: Intake, Brakes, Stereo 90%, bars, AVO TMIC
To fit: Sil intake, ECU, 3 Port, Walbro
WWW (button below) for my Subaru/Audi dyno's, detailing, pics and mods!

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The STiG
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby The STiG » Mon Apr 28, 2008 6:47 pm

LOL Craig,

Very true, the list is long but oh so necessary....
Some serious time and care put into the detailing.
They never post how long it took them... wonder why.
Ada///M.

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cpitts
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby cpitts » Mon Apr 28, 2008 7:33 pm

hehe, 2 tru. There's days worth there, not hours and that's just on the paint.
'07 Lib GT Spec B <- adjusting
Done: Intake, Brakes, Stereo 90%, bars, AVO TMIC
To fit: Sil intake, ECU, 3 Port, Walbro
WWW (button below) for my Subaru/Audi dyno's, detailing, pics and mods!

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Re: Car Detailing

Postby Harbs » Mon Apr 28, 2008 8:16 pm

Wow, nice link there Adam, If i could get the Foz looking like that (and staying like it for a while) id be a happy man! :lol:
Team
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The STiG
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby The STiG » Mon Apr 28, 2008 9:54 pm

Harbs wrote:Wow, nice link there Adam, If i could get the Foz looking like that (and staying like it for a while) id be a happy man! :lol:


Well mate, I feel a CLAY & WAX weekend coming up after DECA if you are keen....
Im sure we could rope a few others in as well...
Ada///M.

PS Pretty nice colour too Craig, Im sure your wife loves it....

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Mr Corduroy
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby Mr Corduroy » Mon Apr 28, 2008 10:18 pm

I notice they bother to measure paint thickness beforehand.

What about afterward?
Silver MY05 WRX & Blue MY98 WRX

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The STiG
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby The STiG » Mon Apr 28, 2008 10:21 pm

Unsure Andrew.
I will send Phil a PM and ask him.
I know he goes to great lengths to ensure he can work within the constraints of what the Factory has / hasn't done.
Ada///M.

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The STiG
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby The STiG » Tue Apr 29, 2008 11:15 am

Info back from Phil for you Andrew.

As for the measurements I do take them at the end and they are typically 1-3 microns different from the before shots.

I will take some measurements and take pictures next time.
Ada///M.

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DrK
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby DrK » Tue Apr 29, 2008 8:18 pm

Beautiful results there... Beautiful...
I can't help but get a boner everytime i see an RS4 - pure animal! It's love :wub: Don't ask - it's complicated...! :whistle:
I'd be up for a clay and wax session - need to get a couple coats of NXT on mine b4 i head OS for 5 wks. (car will be parked on street to the elements :( )
Dr Koe Davidson

Now: '99 Ford Fiesta Ghia
Prev: '08 VW R32 3dr 6spd Manual / '05 Lib GT Wagon. Dual STi Genome's, Xede ECU, 150kw atw @ STi
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Mr Corduroy
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Re: Car Detailing

Postby Mr Corduroy » Tue Apr 29, 2008 9:10 pm

The STiG wrote:Info back from Phil for you Andrew.

As for the measurements I do take them at the end and they are typically 1-3 microns different from the before shots.

I will take some measurements and take pictures next time.
Ada///M.



Adam,

Hmmm, those swirl marks must only be a few microns deep? I guess the clear coat must be 25-50 microns thick, so no risk of cutting through it then.
Silver MY05 WRX & Blue MY98 WRX

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